architecture | design

Bat Cloud: Rotterdam

Rotterdam, NL, 2014

Exhibited in Kunsthal for the 2014 International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam: Urban by Nature.

Permanently installed in Peace Garden, Rotterdam, NL.

From antsoftheprairie.com: 

Bat Cloud is a hanging canopy of vessels that is designed and constructed to support bat habitation. From afar, the piece appears like a cloud, hovering in the trees. Closer up, viewers from below would be able to see plants hanging from each vessel. At dusk, onlookers would hopefully be able to catch sight of bats or other wildlife emerging from the habitation vessels.

Each vessel is formed in a way to allow bats to enter and inhabit its uppermost portion. The lower volume of each vessel is filled with soil and native plants. The vessels are also designed so that bat guano would collect in the soil-filled planting area, thus fertilizing the vegetation. The lowermost portion of each vessel is constructed in a way to allow for slow water drainage.

Design and Fabrication Manager, Lead Fabricator: Joseph Swerdlin; Fabrication Assistants: Sze Wan Li-Bain, Robert Yoos, Ian Liu, Andres Santandreu; Installation Team: Joseph Swerdlin, Sze Wan Li-Bain, Robert Yoos, IABR and Kunsthal Staff; Pompenburg Park Re-installation Manager: Joseph Swerdlin, with IABR and Kunsthal Staff


Kerrigan-Lowdermilk Timline

Buffalo, New York, 2013

A timeline that diagrams the interconnected life of duo Kerrigan-Lowdermilk.

K+L_AI_JMS+JH_0920.jpg

Bat Cloud: Buffalo

Buffalo, New York, 2012

Installed at Tifft Nature Preserve, Buffalo, New York

From antsoftheprairie.com: 

Bat Cloud is a hanging canopy of vessels that is designed and constructed to support bat habitation. From afar, the piece appears like a cloud, hovering in the trees. Closer up, viewers from below would be able to see plants hanging from each vessel. At dusk, onlookers would hopefully be able to catch sight of bats or other wildlife emerging from the habitation vessels.

Each vessel is formed in a way to allow bats to enter and inhabit its uppermost portion. The lower volume of each vessel is filled with soil and native plants. The vessels are also designed so that bat guano would collect in the soil-filled planting area, thus fertilizing the vegetation. The lowermost portion of each vessel is constructed in a way to allow for slow water drainage.

Project design and fabrication manager: Sze Wan Li-Bain; Concept collaborator: Mikaila Waters; Fabrication collaborators: Robert Yoos, Molly Hogle, Duane Warren, Shawn Lewis; Installation collaborators: Matthieu Bain, Joshua Gardner, Shawn Lewis, Sze Wan Li-Bain, Sergio López-Piñeiro, Nellie Niespodzinski, Mark Nowaczyk, Alex Poklinkowski, Joseph Swerdlin, Duane Warren, Robert Yoos; Consultants: Mark Bajorek, Katharina Dittmar; Fluid Culture organizers: Colleen Culleton, Justin Read; Tifft/Buffalo Musuem of Science coordinators: Lauren Makeyenko, David Spiering


Bat Tower

Buffalo, New York, 2010

Installed at Griffis Sculpture Park, Buffalo, New York.

From antsoftheprairie.com:

In an attempt to bring visibility to bats, Bat Tower challenges notions of the typical off-the-shelf bat house. Rather than innocuously fading into the background, the tower stands as a prominently visible outdoor sculpture. Drawing from the idea of a vertical case, the installation has a heavy and intense presence, contrasting the lightness and invisibility associated with do-it-yourself bat house constructions.

Design collaborators: Thomas Giannino, Micahel Pudlewski, Laura Schmitz, Nicole Marple, Mark Nowaczyk; Construction collaborators: Michael Pudlewski, Laura Schmitz, Nicole Marple, Mark Nowaczyk, Dan Dimillo, Matt Salzer, Jacob West; Installation collaborators: Matthieu Bain, Albert Chao, Joshua Gardner, Shawn Lewis, Sergio López-Piñeiro, Nellie Niespodzinski, Mark Nowaczyk, Michael Pudlewski, Joseph Swerdlin, Angela Wu; Consultants: Katharina Dittmar, Mark Bajorek; Installation photographers: Albert Chao, Nellie Niespodzinski, Angela Wu; Special thanks to Richard Yencer and the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning Shop